Level – Intermediate

Questionnaires in Clinical Trials: Guidelines for Optimal Design and Administration

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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Source: Trials Journal

Type: Online Journal Article

Level: Intermediate

Description: Questionnaire design for Clinical Trials

Continuing Education Credits: N/A

 



Dissemination and Imp​lementation in Health and Healthcare Training Guide and Workbook

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Source: The Regents of the University of Colorado

Type: PDF Document and Canvas Website

Level: Intermediate

Description: This is a PDF and link to a website that includes materials from a workshop on Dissemination and ​implementation in Health and Healthcare. “The workshop objective was to introduce participants to D&I concepts, strategies, and design principles, and to help participants formulate D&I research questions, develop D&I plans, and identify where to access D&I-specific resources. The workshop was designed to be relevant to health researchers, practitioners, and other professionals interested in D&I to improve health and healthcare…” (cited from the website).



Formative Evaluation: Fostering Real-Time Adaptions and Refinements to Improve the Effectiveness of Patient-Centered Medical Home Interventions

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Source: PCMH (Patient Centered Medical Home)

Type: Article

Level: Intermediate

Description: This article explains the different stages of formative evaluations.



Efficient Orthogonal Designs: Testing the Comparative Effectiveness of Alternative Ways of Implementing Patient-Centered Medical Home Components

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Source: PCMH (Patient Centered Medical Home)

Type: Article

Level: Intermediate

Description: “Efficient orthogonal design is a tool that must be used at the outset of a study that can be used to compare the effectiveness of different ways of deploying each component of a PCMH, as well as how the effects of individual components interact with one another.” www.pcmh.ahrq.gov



Cognitive Task Analysis: Methods to Improve Patient-Centered Medical Home Models by Understanding and Leveraging its Knowledge Work

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Source: PCMH (Patient Centered Medical Home)

Type: Article

Level: Intermediate

Description: ”Cognitive task analysis (CTA) is a family of methods designed to reveal the thinking involved in performing tasks in real-world contexts. CTA can be used to uncover and describe key patterns, variations, opportunities for improvement, and leverage the “knowledge work”—not just the physical work—of primary care staff and clinicians implementing PCMH models.”



Integrating Patient-Centered Outcomes into CBPR: A Real-World Example

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Source: Clinical Directors Network, Inc.

Type: Audio/video capture (mp4; 14min in duration)

Level: Intermediate

Description: This session aims to capture a real-world example of a collaborative, community-engaged research partnership. We hope that viewers are able to use these examples as a model in developing their own Community-Based Participatory Research (CPBR) projects.

The featured CBPR Project is entitled “Establishing a Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) Surveillance Network”, funded by: The Rockefeller University Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS); Pilot Grant and Administrative Supplement (NIH-NCATS Grant # 8-UL1-TR000043). This project is a collaboration between the Rockefeller University, multiple Community Health Centers (Urban health Plan, Manhattan Physicians Group 125th Street, Open Door Family Health Center, Hudson River Health Care, Brookdale Family Care Center, and Manhattan Physicians Group 95th Street), and multiple Practice Based Research Networks (Alliance of Chicago, Clinical Directors Network, Inc. of New York City and STARNet, San Antonio Texas). All members are engaged and participate onsite or virtually.

Dr. Jonathan N. Tobin President and CEO of Clinical Directors Network, Inc. leads a discussion about patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR). He talks about the definition of PCOR, how PCOR relates to clinical outcomes, and engages the group in discussion about how to incorporate patient-centered outcomes into the CA-MRSA research project. CHC are engaged in exploring outcomes to investigate taken directly from their patient’s experiences at the FQHC. This is used to drive the research development process.



Dissemination and Reporting of Research Findings: A Community Health Center Engaged Process

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Source: Clinical Directors Network, Inc.

Type: Audio/Video Capture (mp4; 13 minutes in duration)

Level: Intermediate

Description: This session aims to capture a real-world example of a collaborative, community-engaged research partnership. We hope that viewers are able to use these examples as a model in developing their own Community-Based Participatory Research (CPBR) projects.

The featured CBPR Project is entitled “Establishing a Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) Surveillance Network”, funded by: The Rockefeller University Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS); Pilot Grant and Administrative Supplement (NIH-NCATS Grant # 8-UL1-TR000043). This project is a collaboration between the Rockefeller University, multiple Community Health Centers (Urban health Plan, Manhattan Physicians Group 125th Street, Open Door Family Health Center, Hudson River Health Care, Brookdale Family Care Center, and Manhattan Physicians Group 95th Street), and multiple Practice Based Research Networks (Alliance of Chicago, Clinical Directors Network, Inc. of New York City and STAR-NET, San Antonio Texas). All members are engaged and participate onsite or virtually.

This session provides an example of the collaborative discussion of dissemination strategies needed to disseminate findings of this CBPR project. Dissemination strategies focus on reaching professionals as well as community members. Strategies are discussed, including abstracts and papers and presentations at academic meetings. The CHC team-members are actively involved in this process: they discuss abstracts they have presented and will present at national and local conferences related to the project and brainstorm future dissemination opportunities including live and virtual webcast presentations.

 

 

 



Lessons Learned Obtaining Informed Consent in Research with Vulnerable Populations in Community Health Center Settings

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Source:  Riden HE, Grooms KN, Clark CR, Cohen LR, Gagne J, Tovar DA, Ommerborn MJ, Orton PS, Johnson PA. BMC Research Notes.  2012 Nov 7; 5:624.

Type: Open Access Research Article

Level: Intermediate

Description: This research articles discusses  the informed consent process and recruitment barriers in the context of a medical record review study.

 



Toolkit for Building Primary Care Research at Your Community Health Center

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Source: Harvard Catalyst

Type: Toolkit

Level: Intermediate

Description:

From the toolkit:

“This toolkit is designed to provide clinical and administrative staff at Community Health Centers with the elements involved in building a primary care research infrastructure. Organized into eight stand-alone modules, health center clinicians and staff will find information on the following:

  1. Introduction to Quality Improvement and Research
  2. Building Primary Care Research Infrastructure
  3. Data: Access and Utilization
  4. Study Design and Methods Overview
  5. Dissemination and Action
  6. Funding Your Research
  7. Partnerships for Research
  8. Ethics and the Institutional Review Board”

 



Integrating Economic Analysis into NIH Funded Research

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Source:  The NIH Common Fund for Health Economics

Type: PDF Document

Level: Intermediate

Description: This resources contains an executive summary of the Health Economics Common Fund’s webinar conference, Integrating Economic Analysis into NIH Funded Research. 

From the document:

“The purpose of this webinar is to encourage collaboration between biobehavioral investigators and economists so that clinical trials and other studies are designed to promote appropriate and prompt implementation of effective and efficacious interventions. Incorporating health economics expertise on the effects of financial and organizational incentives and constraints on the behavior of various stake holders can expedite implementation of clinical, behavioral, and organizational interventions with proven efficacy in the areas of promoting health and wellbeing.

The featured webinar participants shared an example of a clinical trial to which economic analyses were added. They then explored the value of incorporating an economic perspective from the inception of clinical study design.”